Entertainment

How glad we were to know Nancy

BY HOWARD CAMPBELL
Observer senior writer

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Print this page Email A Friend!


What would Sunday radio in Jamaica be without a Nancy Wilson song? Hard to imagine. The jazz stylist, who died in California on December 13 at age 81, was beloved in Jamaica where she performed several times.

The feisty vocalist last performed here at the Jamaica Jazz & Blues Festival in 2010. She was among a group of female singers Jamaicans fell in love with during the 1950s and 1960s, others being Dinah Washington and country singer Skeeter Davis.

Wilson is on record saying she was greatly influenced by Washington, a troubled artiste best known for the song What A Difference A Day Makes. Wilson's catalogue of hits was extensive; Jamaicans are most acquainted with the 1964 jazz standard (You Don't Know) How Glad I Am and I Wanna Be With You.

Disc jockey Michael Thompson is a major Nancy Wilson fan. KOOL Memories, his four-hour Sunday show on KOOL FM, regularly features Wilson favourites such as Never Less Than Yesterday, I Wanna Be With You and Afterthoughts.

He told the Jamaica Observer that singers like Nancy Wilson are fast becoming extinct.

“She had a distinct voice; not many singers have that today. In her day, the arrangement of the music was superior and she helped make it even more special,” said Thompson.

Wilson performed in Jamaica during the 1960s at the peak of her career. She followed the path of Billie Holliday, Ella Fitzgerald and Washington, whose sultry phrasings broke down America's racial barriers, and endeared them to jazz and pop audiences.

Interestingly, Wilson disliked being categorised. Though she was most popular in jazz circles, she was happy covering pop songs like The Beatles' Yesterday and Reach Out (I'll Be There) by The Four Tops.

In Jamaica, the dancehall generation admired Wilson. Sanchez covered 'How Glad I Am; sound system selectors used that song to 'kill' rivals.

Nancy Wilson was a three-time Grammy winner. Her last came for Turned to Blue which won Best Jazz Album in 2007.


Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaperlive


ADVERTISEMENT




POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper � email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT