Marley's UK years for docu-film

Entertainment

Marley's UK years for docu-film

BY BRIAN BONITTO
Associate Editor —
Auto & Entertainment
bonittob@jamaicaobserver.com

Wednesday, August 05, 2020

Print this page Email A Friend!


BOB Marley's influence on British culture will be focus of a one-hour documentary titled When Bob Marley Came to Britain , slated for the BBC2 this month.

According to British music journalism website NME, the film will investigate the Jamaican reggae singer's influence on the United Kingdom's music scene.

Narrated by Obaro Ejimiwe, When Bob Marley Came to Britian will include rare archive footage and interviews with people who met and knew Marley across the UK.

It is produced and directed by Stuart Ramsay, while Karen Gabay produced the story. Mark Robinson of Wise Owl Films is credited as executive producer.

“We know that Bob Marley's music has impacted on millions of people's lives across the planet – but less well known are the life-changing stories of the people he met while he lived in the UK,” said Robinson.

“Although Marley lived and recorded in London during the Seventies he also toured the country extensively – from Teesside to Lancaster, Birmingham to Bristol – and helped change the culture of Britain along the way.

“For this documentary we talked to those who have never forgotten their encounter with Marley – whether they accompanied him on tour, saw him perform in their school hall, or were present when he visited Rastafarian communities in the North of England,” he said.

“It's also the story of how Britain changed Bob Marley – it was the place he called his second home and played a major role in making him a global superstar,” he concluded.

Marley had moved to London in 1977, one month after surviving an assassination attempt at his home in Jamaica. He occupied a three-storey home at 42 Oakley Street in fashionable Chelsea.

Most of the songs Marley wrote during his time in London made it on the epic Exodus album, released in June 1977. Others included on Kaya, released in 1978.

Driven by the powerful title song, Exodus also included Natural Mystic, So Much Things To Say, Guiltiness, The Heathen, Jamming, Waiting In Vain, Turn Your Lights Down Low, Three Little Birds, and One Love/People Get Ready.

In 2016, the BBC proclaimed One Love/People Get Ready the Song of the Millennium.

According to a BBC release, When Bob Marley Came to Britian will “reveal how [Marley's] presence helped influence British politics, culture and identity, during a time of massive social and civil unrest in the UK – and how his universal message of One Love and unity helped inspire a generation of black British youth”.

“This film also takes a revealing look at Marley's time in Britain: the houses he lived in, football kickabouts in Battersea Park and visits to the UK's growing Rastafarian community, including secret gigs in the North of England. It was in Britain that Marley established himself as an international artiste, recorded some of his most successful albums and performed some of his most memorable concerts,” it continued.

Marley returned to Jamaica in April 1978 for the One Love Peace Concert at the National Stadium in Kingston.

He died from cancer in May 1981 in Miami at age 36.


Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaper-login


ADVERTISEMENT




POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper � email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT