Prezident changes course

Entertainment

Prezident changes course

BY HOWARD CAMPBELL
Observer senior writer

Monday, September 28, 2020

Print this page Email A Friend!


Fans who have followed Prezident Brown's career associate him with Rastafari and roots-reggae, but for his next project the veteran singjay changes course.

He told the Jamaica Observer last week that his first album in three years will have a strong hip hop flavour. The set is currently in production in Northern California where Prezident Brown lives.

“Mi love hip hop! Mi been doing hip hop songs on mi albums long time but dis is di first time mi going to do five or six (hip hop) song on a album,” he said.

Prezident Brown, 55, describes the sound as “voice and beats”. He is working with beat-makers from California and Rivah Jordan (son of singer Jack Radics) on the album which he hopes to release next year.

His previous album, the aptly titled Journeyman Pilgrimage, came out three years ago.

Though he is known for hard-hitting songs like Faith and Micro Chip, Prezident Brown has also experimented with hip hop. Generation Next, his 2003 album, contains the songs Oh La La (Pump it Up) and Priority Jam (with Gentleman), which were a departure from his roots sound.

He points to hip hop heavyweights Tupac Shakur, The Notorious BIG and The Fugees as some of his favourite acts.

While there has been a break between albums, Prezident Brown (real name Fitz Cotterell) continues to record songs for various producers such as Cliff Manswell, a Trinidadian musician who has played in his band for many years.

His latest single, Son of A Gun, is part of The Message, an EP produced by Manswell scheduled for release next week.

Born in Clarendon but raised in Oracabessa, St Mary, Brown was a protégé of producer/sound system operator Lawrence “Jack Ruby” Lindo. He started out in the music business during the mid-1980s performing on Ruby's 'sound' in Ochi Rios and began recording late that decade.

Most of his albums are done for independent record companies in Europe and the United States.


Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaper-login


ADVERTISEMENT




POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper � email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT