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Obama, Bush slam Trump-era politics

Saturday, October 21, 2017

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VIRGINIA, United States (AP) — Former President Barack Obama called on fellow Democrats to reject politics of “division” and “fear” while rallying on Thursday with party's candidates for governors in Virginia and New Jersey.

“Why are we deliberately trying to misunderstand each other, and be cruel to each other and put each other down? That's not who we are,” Obama said at the Virginia rally in front of several thousand supporters.

Stepping back into the political spotlight for the first time since leaving the White House in January, Obama did not mention President Donald Trump in his speeches at Richmond's convention centre or at a Newark hotel. But he did tell crowds at both events that they could send a message to the rest of the country in the upcoming elections.

“Our democracy's at stake and it's at stake right here in Virginia,” Obama said.

Virginia and New Jersey are the only two states electing new governors this year and those November 7 races will be considered a bellwether of Democrats' strength in the face of Trump's victory last year.

New Jersey Democrat Phil Murphy, Obama's former ambassador to Germany, is facing Republican Lt Gov Kim Guadagno. Virginia Lt Gov Ralph Northam, a Democrat, is running against Republican Ed Gillespie.

Obama's remarks came on the same day as former President George W Bush denounced bigotry in Trump-era American politics, warning that the rise of “nativism”, isolationism and conspiracy theories have clouded the nation's true identity.

Obama bemoaned the rise of racial politics.

“Some of the politics we see now we thought we put that to bed,” Obama said. “That's folks looking 50 years back. It's the 21st century, not the 19th century.”

The first black president offered himself as proof that the country could move forward, telling the crowd in Richmond, the former Capitol of the Confederacy, that he is a distant relative to Confederate President Jefferson Davis on his mother's side.

“Think about that,” Obama said. “I'll bet he's spinning in his grave.”

Obama praised Northam, a paediatric neurologist, as a candidate who would well represent Virginia and accused Gillespie of running a fear-based campaign. Gillespie said Obama's comments were not a “surprise” coming at a rally for Northam.

Guadagno's spokesman, Ricky Diaz, suggested it's Murphy and not Republicans who are divisive.

“Phil Murphy is the one who will divide New Jersey by raising taxes so high that only the ber rich like him will be able to afford to live here,” he said.

Obama's popularity is still undeniable. In an August NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, 51 per cent of Americans said they have a favourable opinion of Obama, while 35 per cent had a negative opinion. In the same poll, 36 per cent said they had a positive opinion of Trump and 52 per cent had a negative opinion.

Obama never completely disappeared from public life, in part because of Trump's constant criticism and efforts to undo much of Obama's legacy after eight years in office. He has publicly defended his policies that Trump and the GOP-led Congress have set out to dismantle: The Affordable Care Act and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals programme, or DACA, which allowed immigrants brought into the country illegally as children to be temporarily shielded from deportation.

Obama was forced to return “pretty quickly”, presidential historian Julian Zelizer of Princeton University said.

“The current president has changed all the conventional assumptions about what to do,” Zelizer said. “There is a sense of urgency that makes this moment different than others, and former President Obama has continued to be directly in Trump's line of fire — both his policies and his legacy.”

Richmonder Les Kenney said Obama's speech was inspiring.

“It was great to see him again, he's an energiser,” he said.

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