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Trump's legal team breathes a sigh, takes a victory lap

Sunday, April 21, 2019

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WASHINGTON, DC, United States (AP) — First they cooperated. Then they stonewalled. Their television interviews were scattershot and ridiculed, their client mercurial and unreliable.

But President Donald Trump's legal team, through a combination of bluster, legal precedent and shifting tactics, managed to protect their client from a potentially perilous in-person interview during special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. His lawyers are taking a victory lap after a redacted version of Mueller's findings revealed politically damaging conduct by the president but drew no conclusions of criminal behaviour.

“Our strategy came to be that when we weren't talking, we were losing,” Rudy Giuliani, one of Trump's lawyers, told The Associated Press in a recent interview. Given that Mueller could not indict a sitting president, Giuliani said, the team kept its focus on Mueller's “capacity to report, so we had to play in the media as well as legally”.

The aftershocks from the Mueller report released Thursday will help shape the next two years of Trump's Administration. But while the report may cause some Democrats to take a renewed look at impeachment despite long odds of success in Congress, the legal threat to Trump that seemed so dangerous upon Mueller's appointment in May 2017 has waned.

At the outset, that appointment led Trump to predict “the end of my presidency”. The White House struggled to recruit top Washington attorneys, many of whom were reluctant to work for a temperamental, scandal-prone president who repeatedly claimed he would be his own best legal mind.

The initial strategy of the Trump legal team, including White House attorney Ty Cobb and personal defence lawyer John Dowd, was to be as cooperative as possible with Mueller's prosecutors and ensure that investigators got access to the documents they requested and the witnesses they wanted to interview. The Trump lawyers hoped to bring about a quick conclusion to the investigation.

Believing he could exonerate himself, Trump initially expressed a willingness to sit for an interview with Mueller's team. A date was set for that to take place at Camp David. But then the president's lawyers moved away from the plan, in part by arguing that the special counsel already had gotten answers to his questions.

“It became the most transparent investigation in history,” Jay Sekulow, one of the president's personal lawyers, said in an interview.

Still, there was internal tumult along the way, including the March 2018 departure of Dowd, a veteran and experienced criminal defence attorney, and the additions of Giuliani and the husband-wife team of Martin and Jane Raskin.

Even as the legal team professed cooperation with Mueller's prosecutors, the lawyers expressed impatience, frustration and scepticism in a series of private letters that challenged the credibility of the Government's witnesses and the demands to interview the president.

In a November 2018 correspondence, one of a series of letters obtained by news outlets, the president's legal team attacked the questions Mueller wanted to ask the president as “burdensome if submitted to a routine witness, let alone presented to the president of the United States, more than two years after the events at issue while he continued to navigate numerous, serious matters of State, national security and domestic emergency”.

Those private complaints were dwarfed by louder public protests. Trump spent months engaging in daily, sometimes hourly, attacks on Mueller's team, declaring the investigation a “Witch Hunt” and questioning the integrity of the investigators.

Giuliani, in many ways more of a television spokesman than conventional lawyer, amplified those attacks. He went so far as to accuse the investigators of misconduct and to portray Mueller, who as a Marine officer had led a rifle platoon in Vietnam, as unpatriotic.

The former New York City mayor became a human smoke screen, making accusations and offering theories often meant to distract and obfuscate. He was a punch line on cable news channels, and his interviews were mocked as blunder-filled performances.


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