COVID shrinks Latin American trade for 2020 — UN

COVID shrinks Latin American trade for 2020 — UN

Saturday, January 23, 2021

Print this page Email A Friend!


SANTIAGO,Chile(AFP) — The coronavirus pandemic has triggered the steepest drop in Latin American foreign trade in 2020 since the global financial crisis more than a decade ago, a UN body said Friday.

Exports from the region are estimated to have fallen 13 per cent in value in 2020, and imports by 20 per cent, the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and theCaribbean(ECLAC) said in a report.

The contraction in the value of exports was smaller than forecast (-23 per cent) last August, the organisation said.

At the time, "the rebound in demand among the region's main trading partners, and China in particular, was not yet visible".

The report said the greatest contraction of exports was in those bound for the region itself (-24 per cent), while shipments to the United States and European Union were expected to fall by 14 per cent and 13 per cent respectively.

Exports to China should grow two per cent, driven by agricultural and mineral and metal shipments, mainly from SouthAmerica.

Exports of crops and livestock products are projected to increase slightly by two per cent, while manufacturing exports are expected to drop 14 per cent and mining and oil exports by 21 per cent.

Imports would post double-digit declines in all categories.

"In sum, the expected trend in regional foreign trade in 2020 suggests there will be a loss of productive capacity in the industrial sector," said the report.

The Latin American andCaribbeanregion has been hard hit by the coronavirus epidemic with 17 million recorded infections and more than 550,000 deaths.

The ECLAC has forecast a 7.7-per cent economic contraction for the region for 2020, the largest in 120 years.

The commission's executive secretary, Alicia Barcena, said Friday stronger regional integration was needed to boost economic resilience.

"The region has been 'disintegrating' in terms of trade and production since the middle of the last decade, coinciding with its lowest growth in seven decades," said Barcena.

COVID shrinks Latin American trade for 2020 — UN

SANTIAGO,Chile(AFP) — The coronavirus epidemic has triggered the steepest drop in Latin American foreign trade in 2020 since the global financial crisis more than a decade ago, a UN body said Friday.

Exports from the region are estimated to have fallen 13 per cent in value in 2020, and imports by 20 per cent, the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and theCaribbean(ECLAC) said in a report.

The contraction in the value of exports was smaller than forecast (-23 per cent) last August, the organisation said.

At the time, "the rebound in demand among the region's main trading partners, and China in particular, was not yet visible".

The report said the greatest contraction of exports was in those bound for the region itself (-24 per cent), while shipments to the United States and European Union were expected to fall by 14 per cent and 13 per cent respectively.

Exports to China should grow two per cent, driven by agricultural and mineral and metal shipments, mainly from SouthAmerica.

Exports of crops and livestock products are projected to increase slightly by two per cent, while manufacturing exports are expected to drop 14 per cent and mining and oil exports by 21 per cent.

Imports would post double-digit declines in all categories.

"In sum, the expected trend in regional foreign trade in 2020 suggests there will be a loss of productive capacity in the industrial sector," said the report.

The Latin American andCaribbeanregion has been hard hit by the coronavirus epidemic with 17 million recorded infections and more than 550,000 deaths.

The ECLAC has forecast a 7.7-per cent economic contraction for the region for 2020, the largest in 120 years.

The commission's executive secretary, Alicia Barcena, said Friday stronger regional integration was needed to boost economic resilience.

"The region has been 'disintegrating' in terms of trade and production since the middle of the last decade, coinciding with its lowest growth in seven decades," said Barcena.


Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaper-login


ADVERTISEMENT




POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper � email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT