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PNP against Kanye West's use of national symbols

Sunday, October 20, 2019

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KINGSTON, Jamaica — The People's National Party (PNP) says that despite the withdrawal of the items bearing the Jamaican Coat of Arms and other national symbols which were on sale on Kanye West's Sunday Service website, there are still questions to be answered about their use and the approval process for such utilisation.

The PNP noted that the nation's Coat of Arms was evident on the shirts worn by West and members of his choir during their performance at his “Sunday Service” showcase, held at Emancipation Park on Friday, October 18.

And, PNP Shadow Minister of Youth and Entertainment, Dwayne Vaz, has raised concerns about the use of these national symbols as part of a “for-profit” commercial enterprise and said it should not be tolerated as it is not in compliance with existing regulations.

Vaz said it is “quite alarming” that the Culture Minister Olivia Grange, admitted in a press release that she noticed the items being worn at the concert, yet she did not raise any concern about it immediately.

“Is it that Minister's only issue of contention is with the sale of the items and not with the general use of the items?” Vaz questioned.

“Minister Grange has also made mention of a committee whichwas established years ago to deal with the proper use of our emblems and symbols, and claimed that work on this committee stopped after the change of administration. Even so, Minister Grange had been re-appointed in this post three-and-a-half years ago and did not see it fit to re-establish this committee until now, because of the public outcry. This is, therefore, a lame excuse being advanced to cover the poor administration of those public policy issues,” Vaz said.

Vaz added that the PNP looks forward to the clarification from the government on the issue and would participate in any constructive discussion aimed at finding a solution for the proper use and handling of all national emblems and symbols associated with our heritage.


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