Letters to the Editor

Moral foundation must bolster economic progress

Wednesday, July 11, 2012    

Print this page Email A Friend!


Dear Editor,

There need not be another debate centred on the economic quagmire in which our country now finds itself; our financial woes must be among the best documented worldwide. It is a sad prospect that future generations of Jamaicans will all be born into debt.

It is clear that the rise of our country's debt stock was countered by a decline in our collective values, attitudes and morals. We often lament our debilitating crime situation and we are quick to highlight our social ills, but we are never in a grand hurry to remedy those ills, especially those which relate to a systematic breakdown in the respect for law and order. Our decrepit buildings and graffiti-strewn walls paint a picture which offers a much graver image than that of lost investment and vandalism; such sites now serve as monuments which pay homage to our moral bankruptcy.

It is clear that the rise of our country's debt stock was countered by a decline in our collective values, attitudes and morals. We often lament our debilitating crime situation and we are quick to highlight our social ills, but we are never in a grand hurry to remedy those ills, especially those which relate to a systematic breakdown in the respect for law and order. Our decrepit buildings and graffiti-strewn walls paint a picture which offers a much graver image than that of lost investment and vandalism; such sites now serve as monuments which pay homage to our moral bankruptcy.

We must take a serious look at a much larger portrait: one which lends itself to the futility of foreign direct investment coming from abroad when not enough has been invested locally to produce men and women who have some respect for punctuality and for other people's resources. A sound work ethic should also be in the mix.

Before we hold workshops and seminars on how to encourage capital inflows, we need to decide on how best to improve our moral capital, especially within the workforce and also the wider society. We need to inculcate in the youth an appreciation for worthwhile traditional values, and we need adults who understand what it means to be an example to the young and old alike. Our economic prospects will not improve unless we adopt a principled approach to life. One thing is certain: the behaviour of our parliamentarians will not further this cause.

Noel Matherson

noelmatherson@gmail.com

ADVERTISEMENT

POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

 

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper – email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

Will you close your bank account because of Government's tax on withdrawals?
Yes
No


View Results »


ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT