Barbados urges UN to reflect ‘geopolitical realities’ of 21st century

Barbados urges UN to reflect ‘geopolitical realities’ of 21st century

Sunday, September 25, 2016

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UNITED NATIONS, United States (CMC) — In order for the United Nations to deliver on its expectations, Barbados says its organisational structure must reflect the geopolitical realities of the 21st century.
Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade Minister Maxine McClean told the UN General Assembly Debate on Saturday that based on this, Barbados is supportive of efforts to reform the Security Council and to revitalise the General Assembly.
Noting that the theme of this year’s General Assembly is “The Sustainable Development Goals: A Universal Push For Transforming Our World,” McClean said: “We must act now to make the vision of 2030 a reality.
“Barbados believes that partnership and collaboration will be the keys to fulfilling the promise of Agenda 2030,” she said “This is especially true for SIDS (Small Island Developing States).”
McClean noted that Barbados’ Prime Minister Freundel Stuart addressed this in his statement to the AOSIS Leaders’ Conference on the margins of the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States in September 2014.
Stuart then highlighted the importance of United Nations support for the implementation of the SIDS Agenda.
“We therefore welcome the progress made by the Joint Inspection Unit (JIU) in its comprehensive review of the UN system’s support for SIDS and look forward to tangible improvements as a result of its work,” she said.
Noting that she was pleased to participate in the launch, in Barbados, of the Caribbean Human Development Report 2016, under the theme “Multidimensional Progress: Human Resilience Beyond Income,” McClean said it highlighted the unique situation of SIDS and low lying coastal states in the Caribbean.
She said three central issues stood out: Vulnerability, resilience and sustainability.
Stating that Barbados welcomes the report, the Foreign Affairs Minister said the report “validates the consistent call by the Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and of SIDS in general for SIDS to be recognized as a “special case” for sustainable development.
She said the Government of Barbados is devising and implementing effective strategies to strengthen social, economic and environmental resilience, consistent with its national growth and development philosophy.
McClean said the strategies are based on four pillars to support “a Barbados that is socially balanced, economically viable, environmentally sound, and characterized by good governance.
“We are pleased therefore that Barbados is already pursuing the ideals enshrined in [UN] Agenda 2030,” she said.
She noted that the existential threat which climate change poses for SIDS, like Barbados, is well documented, adding “we are a leading advocate for coordinated action at the international level to address the sources and consequences of our vulnerability.
At the national level, she said Barbados has developed a National Climate Change Policy Framework (NCCPF), “which works seamlessly with the Barbados Sustainable Development Policy to address issues of climate adaptation and mitigation.”
McClean said Barbados exercises jurisdiction over its maritime space, which far exceeds its very limited land territory.
“We, therefore, fully recognise the vast potential of the ocean and its sustainable exploitation as an important component of our future development,” she said, disclosing that the Government of Barbados is developing a comprehensive national ocean governance strategy.
She said this strategy will address the sustainable management of our marine space and the sustainable use of Barbados’ marine living and non-living resources.
As the island seeks to protect and preserve its oceans and seas for future generations, McClean said Barbados will continue to participate actively in the various oceans-related processes of the United Nations.
During the current 71st Session, she said her delegation will collaborate with other members of the Association of Caribbean States to strengthen the level of support for the Caribbean Sea Resolution.
She said the ultimate aim is the designation of the Caribbean Sea as a “special area in the context of sustainable development.”
“We count on your support,” McClean said.


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