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Mexico farm town buries 3 of 9 slain Americans

Saturday, November 09, 2019

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LA MORA, Mexico (AP) — As Mexican soldiers stood guard, a mother and two sons were laid to rest in hand-hewn pine coffins in a single grave dug out of the rocky soil yesterday at the first funeral for the victims of a drug cartel ambush that left nine American women and children dead.

Clad in shirt sleeves, suits or modest dresses, about 500 mourners embraced in grief under white tents erected in La Mora, a hamlet of about 300 people who consider themselves Mormon but are not affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Some wept, and some sang hymns.

Members of the extended community — many of whom, like the victims, are dual US-Mexican citizens — had built the coffins themselves and used shovels to dig the shared grave in La Mora's small cemetery. Farmers and teenage boys carried the coffins.

Mourners filed past to view the bodies and pay their final respects to Dawna Ray Langford, 43, and her sons Trevor, 11, and Rogan, two.

They were laid to rest together, just as they died together Monday when attackers fired a hail of bullets at their SUV on a dirt road leading to another settlement, Colonia LeBaron. Six children and three women in all were killed in the attack on the convoy of three SUVs.

In a raw, tearful service, relatives recounted valiant efforts to try to rescue their loved ones after the ambush, and how some of the children walked miles out of the mountains to the town, situated about 70 miles (110 kilometres) south of the Arizona border.

There was no talk of revenge in the deeply religious community, only justice.

“God will take care of the wicked,” Jay Ray, Dawna's father, said in a eulogy.

David Langford called his wife a hero for telling her children to duck as their vehicle came under fire.

“I find it hard to forgive,” he said. “I usually am a very forgiving guy, but this kind of atrocity has no place in a civilised community.”

“My children were brutally, brutally murdered,” he said, “and my beloved wife.”


The three coffins, two of them child-size, were placed into the beds of pick-up trucks, and family members rode with them to the grave, hundreds of mourners following on foot.

Patrols of Mexican army troops passed by regularly on the hamlet's only paved road.


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