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Tearful send-off for crash victim Daveia Angus

BY GARFIELD L ANGUS

Sunday, August 18, 2013    

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THE packed St Catherine-based Kitson Town Baptist Church, along with two large tents, were scenes where tears flowed freely from family members, friends, and the wider National Housing Trust (NHT) circle where the late Daveia Angus was the Acting Geographic Information System

(GIS) Manager.

Glowing tributes were paid at the service of thanksgiving, held on August 10 for the 27-year-old Angus, who was killed after her car reportedly collided with another vehicle on the Mandela Highway, on July 18, while on her way to work.

She died leaving a four-month-old son.

According to her aunt, Jasmine Brown, who was hospitalised at the time of the funeral and died the following day, August 11, through a tribute read by her daughter, Ava Hines, she felt that "Half of me was gone. She visited me in hospital two weeks before she passed on. Little did I know that it would have ended like this where it was the last time I would be seeing my beautiful niece. My beautiful niece was a determined young woman who sought to achieve her goals, despite the odds and challenges. She always had encouraging words to say to those who came in close contact with her. I remember the family gatherings that she attended, where she and my daughter would have fun conversations, and her favourite slang was 'therp,' then they would laugh at each other," Brown said.

According to Senior General Manager for Construction and Development at the NHT, Donald Moore, the professional, who studied Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Technology (UTech) and joined the agency's staff in 2008, applied her skills "in an area of study that was new and in demand" and saved the agency millions.

"As a young graduate from university, with very little experience, Daveia very quickly established herself as a valuable member of the GIS team. At work, Daveia exhibited a high level of maturity, rare among people her age. She knew her work, and required very little supervision," Moore told

the congregation.

Moore, while highlighting that the deceased was high-spirited, and found time to be joyful with her work colleagues, noted that she "consistently applied excellent time management and analytical skills to her work. In her first few months with us, Daveia did extensive work in the establishment of a GIS application to site analysis. This was a critical step in the process of land acquisition and the application enabled the making of informed decisions, thus saving the NHT millions of dollars,"

he said.

Monique Copper, who was an inseparable friend of Daveia, from their days at the St Jago High School, in St Catherine, to the University of Technology, and then to the NHT, read the New Testament lesson. Other tributes came from college friends, the Maxwell family, the St Jago High School, the NHT Chorale, among others.

Member of Parliament for West Central St Catherine Dr Kenneth Baugh, in his tribute said the outpouring of grief was "because it is a very valuable person, with loss to family, to the society, to her friends, to her community, to the National Housing Trust, and to our nation. We are very sad, but let us celebrate the goodness of her life: a young Jamaican who was

an achiever."

Family friend Joan Guy-Walker, who delivered the eulogy, described Daveia as a 'model child'.

"Daveia was a parent's delight. Growing up, she could easily be described as a model child. She took her school work seriously; church was an important part of her life. She was a teacher's delight. She was the kind of student that made teachers proud and filled with a sense of achievement, that gave them the motivation to go on when the difficult days came. I am confident that she was an employer's delight as well," she said.

"While this young woman was no-nonsense and outspoken, she never carried a grudge. She had a heart of gold. Daveia had an insatiable appetite for learning. Her brain was like a sponge: it absorbed knowledge. At the time of her death she was pursuing an online Master's in Geographic Information System, at Lund University, in Sweden. She lived a very short, but compact life. She was the kind of personality that worked behind the scenes to make others

realise their true potential," she added.

In his Sermon, Reverend Norva Rodney read from Matthew 18:1-10, in which Jesus exhorted his disciples on the protection of children. He also played Tony Rebel's song Teach the Children, and themed on the subject of duties to others.

"Whoever bad-drive the sister, bad-drive Jesus. And we have lost a young person, not in the prime of life her, yet, but getting there. There is a little one who has lost; there is a four-month-old who will go through his days (if the Lord tarries) on earth not knowing what it is to experience a mother's care, a mother's love. When dem deh ting take place di way dem take place and leave a little one...we can make dah one yah become something that becomes a crucial moment. We can make Daveia's death mean something, that it calls us into some moment of realisation on our duties and responsibilities to others," the pastor said.

Angus' remains were interred at the Dovecot Memorial Park, in St Catherine.

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