Number of migrants worldwide reach 272 million — UN

Increase outpaces growth of world population

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Print this page Email A Friend!


NEW estimates released by the United Nations (UN) Tuesday indicate that the number of international migrants globally has reached an estimated 272 million this year, an increase of 51 million since 2010.

The data also show that international migrants comprise 3.5 per cent of the global population, compared to 2.8 per cent in the year 2000.

The International Migrant Stock 2019, a dataset released by the Population Division of the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) provides the latest estimates of the number of international migrants by age, sex, and origin for all countries and areas of the world. The estimates are based on official national statistics on the foreign-born or the foreign population obtained from population censuses, population registers or nationally representative surveys.

Liu Zhenmin, UN under-secretary-general for DESA, said that “These data are critical for understanding the important role of migrants and migration in the development of both countries of origin and destination. Facilitating orderly, safe, regular, and responsible migration and mobility of people will contribute much to achieving the sustainable development goals.”

In 2019, regionally, Europe hosts the largest number of international migrants (82 million), followed by North America (59 million) and Northern Africa and Western Asia (49 million).

At the country level, about half of all international migrants reside in just 10 countries, with the United States of America hosting the largest number of international migrants (51 million), equal to about 19 per cent of the world's total. Germany and Saudi Arabia host the second-and third- largest numbers of migrants (13 million each), followed by the Russian Federation (12 million), the United Kingdom (10 million), the United Arab Emirates (nine million), France, Canada and Australia (around eight million each) and Italy (six million).

Concerning their place of birth, one-third of all international migrants originate from only 10 countries, with India as the lead country of origin, accounting for about 18 million people living abroad. Migrants from Mexico constituted the second largest 'diaspora' (12 million), followed by China (11 million), the Russian Federation (10 million) and the Syrian Arab Republic (eight million).

The share of international migrants in total population varies considerably across geographic regions, with the highest proportions recorded in Oceania (including Australia and New Zealand) (21.2 per cent) and North America (16 per cent) and the lowest in Latin America and the Caribbean (1.8 per cent), central and southern Asia (one per cent) and eastern and south-eastern Asia (0.8 per cent).

Most international migrants move between countries located within the same region. A majority of international migrants in sub-Saharan Africa (89 per cent), eastern and South-eastern Asia (83 per cent), Latin America and the Caribbean (73 per cent), and Central and southern Asia (63 per cent) originated from the region in which they reside. By contrast, most of the international migrants that lived in North America (98 per cent), Oceania (88 per cent) and northern Africa and western Asia (59 per cent) were born outside their region of residence.

Also, according to the International Migrant Stock 2019, forced displacements across international borders continues to rise. Between 2010 and 2017, the global number of refugees and asylum seekers increased by about 13 million, accounting for close to a quarter of the increase in the number of all international migrants. Northern Africa and western Asia hosted around 46 per cent of the global number of refugees and asylum seekers, followed by sub-Saharan Africa (21 per cent).

Turning to the gender composition, women comprise slightly less than half of all international migrants in 2019. The share of women and girls in the global number of international migrants fell slightly, from 49 per cent in 2000 to 48 per cent in 2019. The share of migrant women was highest in North America (52 per cent) and Europe (51 per cent), and lowest in sub-Saharan Africa (47 per cent) and northern Africa and western Asia (36 per cent).

In terms of age, one out of every seven international migrants is below the age of 20. In 2019, the dataset showed that 38 million international migrants, equivalent to 14 per cent of the global migrant population, were under 20 years of age. Sub-Saharan Africa hosted the highest proportion of young persons among all international migrants (27 per cent), followed by Latin America and the Caribbean, and northern Africa and western Asia (about 22 per cent each).

Three out of every four international migrants are of working age (20-64 years). In 2019, 202 million international migrants, equivalent to 74 per cent of the global migrant population, were between the ages of 20 and 64. More than three quarters of international migrants were of working age in eastern and south-eastern Asia, Europe, and North America.

The International Migrant Stock 2019 presents the results of the 2019 revision of the UN's estimates of the number of international migrants by age, sex, and origin for 232 countries or areas for the mid-point (1 July) of each year: 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, 2015 and 2019.


Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaperlive


ADVERTISEMENT




POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper � email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT