UN warns about criminal activities linked to COVID-19

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UN warns about criminal activities linked to COVID-19

Thursday, July 09, 2020

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UNITED NATIONS (CMC) — The United Nations is warning against a surge in demand for medical products to combat the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) that has led to a jump in the trafficking of substandard and faulty merchandise.

“Health and lives are at risk with criminals exploiting the COVID-19 crisis to cash in on public anxiety and increased demand for PPE [personal protective equipment] and medications,” said Ghada Waly, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

Among its countless other impacts, the coronavirus has further highlighted the shortcomings in regulatory and legal frameworks aimed at preventing the manufacturing and selling of these products, points out the UNODC research study titled 'COVID-19-related Trafficking of Medical Products as a Threat to Public Health'.

The new UN research published yesterday reveals that criminal gangs are exploiting both the uncertainties surrounding the coronavirus and inconsistencies in national regulation regimens.

“Transnational organised crime groups take advantage of gaps in national regulation and oversight to peddle substandard and falsified medical product,” said Waly.

The falsification of medical products bears significant risks for public health as products may not properly treat the disease and may facilitate the development of drug resistance.

Criminal groups have also quickly adjusted to the opportunities arising from the COVID-19 pandemic to exploit the vulnerabilities and gaps in the health and criminal justice systems.

Evidence shows that fraud, scams and seizures, involving the manufacture and trafficking of substandard and falsified medical products, have followed the spread of the virus.

In one case, German health authorities contracted two sales companies in Switzerland and Germany to procure 15 million Euro worth of face masks through a cloned website of an apparently legitimate company in Spain.

“We need to help countries increase cooperation to close gaps, build law enforcement and criminal justice capacity, and drive public awareness to keep people safe,” Waly said.

The pandemic has also highlighted a boom in data-based scams — including phishing and business e-mail attacks — or the creation of fake corporate websites to fool purchasers.

UNODC's research also predicts that the behaviour of organised criminal groups will gradually change over the course of the pandemic.

When a vaccine is developed, it will likely lead to a shift in focus away from PPE smuggling to trafficking in the vaccine. Moreover, cyberattacks on critical infrastructure involved in addressing the pandemic are also likely to continue in the form of online scams aimed at health procurement authorities, according to the research.

Strengthening legal frameworks and penalties, and a more harmonised global approach to the criminalisation of the manufacture and trafficking of falsified medical products is crucial, as only a common approach will enable effective responses to crimes impacting individuals and public health, the UNODC research maintains.

At the same time, however, preventing, detecting, and responding to medical product-related crime will require people who work in the medical product sector to acquire new or additional skills.


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