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Trelawny police could make breakthrough soon in killing of Reserve woman

BY HORACE HINES
Observer West reporter

Thursday, June 25, 2020

RESERVE, Trelawny - The Trelawny police are expecting to make an early arrest in the brutal killing of 36-year-old unemployed Tamara Geddes, who was gunned down in the presence of her 10-year-old daughter at their home here, Saturday night.

“We have several persons of interest who we have started to interview and persons that we are trying to locate to interview. So there are persons of interest at this time,” Superintendent Kirk Ricketts, commander of the Trelawny Police Division, told the Observer West during a telephone interview yesterday.

According to police reports, at about 8:30pm, Geddes was in her bedroom with her 10-year-old daughter when an intruder, armed with a handgun, entered through an open door.

The police say the armed intruder demanded money and cellphones, and was given cash and two cellphones.

But the 36-year-old mother was shot and killed after she resisted the gunman's demand for sex, the police reported.

The daughter, who was not physically harmed, is now in the care of family members.

Lecturer at The University of the West Indies and clinical psychologist Georgia Rose underscored the importance of the adults around the young girl to be aware of how she is coping with the trauma associated with the gruesome death of her mother.

“It's just going to require that the adults in her life are very aware so they are able to identify if there is a marked shift in her behaviour, her appetite, her sleep pattern, her play pattern, her communication pattern, how she engage with other people. If those things don't change then for the most part we may say she is coping adequately,” Rose said.

“She may benefit from professional help to help her process how she feels about what took place. But what I always find with children is if they have supportive relatives they are more likely to cope in a healthy way with the impact of the tragedy. What we want to promote is healthy coping, that she comes to a place where she understands what happened and understand how she feels about what happened.”

The psychologist also explained that trauma may or may not have any bearing on the child's academic performance.

“Exposure to trauma can affect academic performance, but it doesn't mean it will, but it can. Many children have experienced trauma and have gone on to do well academically. And there are a number of things behind that, sometimes just who the child is by nature and also because of the support that they have,” Rose argued.

“If she comes from a supportive school community I would expect that her teachers would provide the necessary support when she returns to school in September.

“It is not a one-size-fits-all, so we can't predict and pre-empt how the child will be affected or how she will respond and how she will be affected.”

The Observer West has learnt that the 10-year-old girl has received counselling from the Child Development Agency (CDA).