Sport

T20s have made the difference, says batting star Smith

Thursday, January 05, 2017    

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BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC) – Twenty20 batting star Dwayne Smith has hailed the emergence of the game’s shortest version, saying it had provided opportunities for those players without extended careers at international level.

The 33-year-old Barbadian played only 10 Tests and 105 One-Day Internationals, but transformed himself into a much sought-after batsman on the global T20 circuit, where he has become a fixture in many of the domestic leagues.

Smith joined an elite group in 2004 when he stroked a hundred on Test debut against South Africa in Durban, but then failed to record a single half-century in his next 12 innings and was dropped.

“I can’t say I would regret (not playing more Test cricket). I don’t live on regrets,” Smith told the Line and Length Network here.


“Let’s just say I don’t think I had the performances or I had put forward enough for the selectors to pick me for more Test cricket. For me, I don’t look back on things like that, I use it as a positive.

“I’ll say one thing though: I’m glad that T20 cricket has [emerged]. That has made a lot for a lot of youngsters coming up and guys who had shortened careers in international cricket.

“For me, T20 has been the best thing that has happened for me, for sure.”

Smith has gone on to play 275 T20s, plundering 6,408 runs, with three centuries at a strike rate of 127.

He has plied his trade extensively in the cash-rich India Premier League, representing high profile sides like Mumbai Indians and Chennai Super Kings, while turning out for new franchise Gujarat Lions last season.

Smith also plays in the T20 tournaments in England, Pakistan and Bangladesh, and is one of the main drawing cards in the Caribbean Premier League.

After turning out for his native Barbados Tridents in the first three years of the tournament, Smith was last season snapped up by Guyana Amazon Warriors but will return to Tridents for this year’s edition.

“I was a bit surprised as well with all those who were surprised that I was not retained [by Tridents] but having said that, I have a life to live so I still had to go and play my cricket,” he said.

“I am very delighted to be back playing for Barbados Tridents and as usual I will go out there and put in the best performances that I can and try to be consistent as usual.

“I’m glad to be back home and I hope I get to play among some guys, especially the youngsters coming through from Barbados as well.”

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