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On the hook for another's SLB loan

TELL
Claudienne

Sunday, October 01, 2017

Dear Claudienne,

I am a former guarantor of a 2006 loan for one year from the Students' Loan Bureau (SLB). The amount of the loan was $118,000.

I have lived overseas for many years and I recently learned that the beneficiary of that 2006 loan now owes the SLB $850,000.

The matter is now in court and I have been summoned to appear in court.

I contacted the SLB in 2016 when it came to my knowledge that the beneficiary was delinquent on the loan. I informed the SLB that I had not been in contact with the beneficiary and that I had not signed to be a guarantor for a loan that the beneficiary received from the SLB for a four-year period (2006-2010).

Even though I was summoned for a court hearing, the SLB acknowledged in an e-mail to me that I was not the guarantor for the 2006- 2010 loan.

I have complained to the SLB that I did not know I was a guarantor, because when it came to the point where the SLB meets the guarantors I was a no-show. At that time the beneficiary told me that because I did not show up, she had to find another guarantor.

Nonetheless, the SLB has produced documents, which they allege I had signed, as proof that I am in fact a guarantor of the loan in question. But there is also a letter that the SLB submitted informing the beneficiary that she needed to replace me as a guarantor for the period 2007-2010.

Yes, it was my bad judgement of character that led me to sign as a guarantor for this friend, and which has got me into this mess. But for the SLB to come after me and my assets for the total amount of the loan, I find to be a fraudulent act. I believe that the SLB should abandon their attempt to grab my assets for the total loan.

Although I informed the SLB that I live overseas and that the best way to contact or inform me was via e-mail, they have not followed my instructions. Instead they sent the letter and summons to my old Jamaican address. The date for the final settlement has passed and there is no number that I can contact in regard to the dispute — only a number to call when the total payments have been made.

This matter is now in disarray, as I strongly believe that I should only be responsible for the portion of the loan that I signed for. The SLB did not inform me of the additional portion of the loan to the beneficiary, and it appears that they just want to recover their money by any means necessary.

Being thousands of miles away, I am baffled as to what steps I can take to have this matter resolved. Currently I have neither the means nor the time to fly to Jamaica to deal with this.

Should I just wait for it to show up on my credit report, then get a lawyer to make it a legal matter?

I would appreciate your help in sorting this out.

SR

 

Dear SR,

Tell Claudienne forwarded to the SLB your e-mail sent to us on July 29, 2017.

We note that since we made the SLB aware of your concerns, they have been in communication with you.

Tell Claudienne has received the following e-mail from the SLB:

“Please be advised that SR had dialogue with an SLB representative subsequent to his e-mail to you of July 29, 2017. During this discussion on August 2, 2017, the SLB representative reiterated to SR that he is only liable for the 2006 loan for which he cosigned. He requested that the closing balance for the 2006 loan be e-mailed to him, and the SLB representative e-mailed it to him on August 4.

In relation to the summons referenced in his e-mail, we are still awaiting the correspondence from the collection agency to confirm what was communicated to him in the letter dispatched to his Jamaican mailing address. For ease of reference we will also forward the initial e-mail thread regarding the guarantor's claim that the beneficiary fraudulently used his documents.”

If you have any further concerns, please e-mail them to the Acting Manager of the Legal Department at the SLB. The e-mail address is: csurjue@slbja.com.

We wish you all the best.