Teenage

Meet the Coop Clan

Tuesday, February 26, 2013    

Print this page Email A Friend!


NEW ventures are one of the many inevitable events in life. Though they provide new opportunities and life lessons, there is always some amount of anxiety that we all face when it is time for the first step.

Many of us can remember what our first year in high school was like, how nervous we felt about the unknown circumstances that we would face. Where novels are concerned, Coop Clan is one which depicts this phenomenon and so much more.

The Coop Clan, penned by Kerine Miller, the producer of the Children's pantomime and founder of the Greatness Exists in Me (GEM) Movement in Jamaica, was released in December 2012.

It is Jamaica's own young-adult novel written by a Jamaican about Jamaicans and set in Jamaica (basically a Jamaican Sweet Valley High).

Written in the third-person narrative, the novel presents five young girls embarking on their high school journey. These five very different girls all stem from different backgrounds, and as time progresses, they learn more about the things they have in common and form a close-knit friendship based on their similarities, rather than using their differences to separate them. Each girl has insecurities and they are all nervous about how they will make it through this new journey in unfamiliar territory.

The main characters Tassea, Tiffany, Danielle, Shari, and Melissa are all unique in their own right, each from different background.

Tassea Beckford is from inner-city Kingston and is very smart. As such, got top grades in her GSAT exams and secured a scholarship to a traditional high school. Tassea's issue to overcome is fitting into a school where there are not many persons from the inner city, while trying to avoid the stereotypes that are placed on people from the 'ghetto'.

Tiffany Metcalfe is wealthy and her father is a part of the school's board. She is used to getting her own way and has somewhat of a little rebellious nature. Feeling abandoned by her very busy, career-driven parents, Tiffany has to work on shunning the bitterness stirred by her family problems.

Danielle Matthews is the athletic one, and is used to having many friends. Starting this new journey she has to learn to put bitter friendships and her parent's divorce behind her and focus on making the best of her high school experience.

Shari Salmon is the 'fluffy' diva who has a big personality, but feels insecure about her weight so she has to learn to be confident in her body and that physical appearance does not define who you are and what you can achieve as a person.

Melissa Dixon is the shy, 'baby' of the group. She has to overcome her overwhelming shyness in order to step out of her shell and realise her true potential.

The author addresses various issues in this novel that young persons face from time to time and utilises the characters to illustrate how TEENs can overcome these challenges. The novel is easy to relate to as it is written about something that we all have faced at some point and the author also keeps the language simple so it is easy to read and understand.

We look forward to more in the series.

— Shanique Hayden

ADVERTISEMENT

POST A COMMENT

HOUSE RULES

 

1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper – email addresses will not be published.

2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.

3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.

4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.

5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.

6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.

7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy



comments powered by Disqus
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Poll

Should the next Police Commissioner be recruited from overseas?
Yes
No


View Results »


ADVERTISEMENT

Today's Cartoon

Click image to view full size editorial cartoon
ADVERTISEMENT