Helping baby sleep through the night
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DESPITE warnings from paediatricians about using over-the-counter medicines with diphenhydramine to induce sleep in children, it’s still a go-to for parents of fussy babies, including those who want them quiet for bedtime, behaving for solemn events, or for long flights. The parents see the antihistamine as a safe option, and it’s widely shared as a go-to in parent groups online.

Some parents have replaced diphenhydramine with melatonin — which is seen as more natural — and melatonin products are available in gummies and sprays for kids, easily accessible on the pharmacy shelves. But doctors say diphenhydramine and melatonin should never be used to make a child drowsy, calm them down, or help them sleep.

Tired of being awake at all hours with your baby? Instead of dosing them up, use these simple tips to help your little one sleep through the night, from the Mayo Clinic.

Developing a rhythm

Newborns sleep 16 or more hours a day, but often in stretches of just a few hours at a time. Although the pattern might be erratic at first, a more consistent sleep schedule will emerge as your baby matures and can go longer between feedings.

By age three to four months, many babies sleep at least five hours at a time. At some point during a baby’s first year — every baby is different — he or she will start sleeping for about 10 hours each night.

Have your baby sleep in your room

Ideally, your baby should sleep in your room with you, but alone in a crib, bassinet or other structure designed for infants, for at least six months, and, if possible, up to one year. This might help decrease the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Adult beds aren’t safe for infants. A baby can become trapped and suffocate between the headboard slats, the space between the mattress and the bed frame, or the space between the mattress and the wall. A baby can also suffocate if a sleeping parent accidentally rolls over and covers the baby’s nose and mouth.

Encouraging good sleep habits

For the first few months, middle-of-the-night feedings are sure to disrupt sleep for parents and babies alike — but it’s never too soon to help your baby become a good sleeper. Consider these tips:

• Follow a consistent, calming bedtime routine. Overstimulation in the evening can make it difficult for your baby to settle to sleep. Try bathing, cuddling, singing, playing quiet music or reading, with a clearly defined end point when you leave the room. Begin these activities before your baby is overtired in a quiet, softly lit room.

• Put your baby to bed drowsy, but awake. This will help your baby associate bed with the process of falling asleep. Remember to place your baby to sleep on his or her back, and clear the crib or bassinet of blankets and other soft items.

• Give your baby time to settle down. Your baby might fuss or cry before finding a comfortable position and falling asleep. If the crying doesn’t stop, check on your baby, offer comforting words and leave the room. Your reassuring presence might be all your baby needs to fall asleep.

• Consider a pacifier. If your baby has trouble settling down, a pacifier might do the trick. In fact, research suggests that using a pacifier during sleep helps reduce the risk of SIDS.

• Keep night-time care low-key. When your baby needs care or feeding during the night, use dim lights, a soft voice and calm movements. This will tell your baby that it’s time to sleep — not play.

•Respect your baby’s preferences. If your baby is a night owl or an early bird, you might want to adjust routines and schedules based on these natural patterns.

Keeping it in perspective

Remember, getting your baby to sleep through the night isn’t a measure of your parenting skills. Take time to understand your baby’s habits and ways of communicating so that you can help him or her become a better sleeper. If you have concerns, talk to your baby’s doctor.

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