Women’s health spotlight — the Bartholin’s cyst
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A Bartholin’s cyst is caused by an obstruction of the outlet of the Bartholin’s gland located near the opening of the vagina. This causes the normal secretions to back up and swell in the gland. Problems arise when the cyst becomes infected, which causes severe pain to the area. If severe enough, the infection can abscess and even spread into the bloodstream, and this requires urgent treatment, including drainage and antibiotics to prevent complications.

Where is the Bartholin’s gland?

The Bartholin’s glands are located on each side of the vaginal opening. These glands secrete fluid that helps lubricate the vagina.

The Mayo Clinic says a Bartholin’s cyst or abscess is common. Treatment of a Bartholin’s cyst depends on the size of the cyst, how painful the cyst is and whether the cyst is infected.

Sometimes home treatment is all you need. In other cases, surgical drainage of the Bartholin’s cyst is necessary. If an infection occurs, antibiotics may be helpful to treat the infected cyst.

Symptoms

If you have a small, non-infected Bartholin’s cyst, you may not notice it. If the cyst grows, you might feel a lump or mass near your vaginal opening. Although a cyst is usually painless, it can be tender.

A full-blown infection of a Bartholin’s cyst can occur in a matter of days. If the cyst becomes infected, you may experience:

•A tender, painful lump near the vaginal opening

• Discomfort while walking or sitting

• Pain during intercourse

• Fever.

A Bartholin’s cyst or abscess typically occurs on only one side of the vaginal opening.

Causes

Experts believe that the cause of a Bartholin’s cyst is a back-up of fluid. Fluid may accumulate when the opening of the gland (duct) becomes obstructed, perhaps caused by infection or injury.

A Bartholin’s cyst can become infected, forming an abscess. A number of bacteria may cause the infection, including Escherichia coli (E coli) and bacteria that cause sexually transmitted infections such as gonorrhoea and chlamydia.

Prevention

There’s no way to prevent a Bartholin’s cyst. However, safer sex practices — in particular, using condoms — and good hygiene habits may help to prevent infection of a cyst and the formation of an abscess.

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor if you have a painful lump near the opening of your vagina that doesn’t improve after two or three days of self-care — for instance, soaking the area in warm water (sitz bath). If the pain is severe, make an appointment with your doctor right away.

Also call your doctor promptly if you find a new lump near your vaginal opening and you’re older than 40. Although rare, such a lump may be a sign of a more serious problem, such as cancer

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