Caribbean Airlines resets expectations
CAL is promising new service standardsas part of its REset for its 15th anniversary

Caribbean Airlines, which now serves 22 cities across the Caribbean, North and Latin America, has launched a new service platform in honour of its 15th anniversary.

Accompanied by a 2022 marketing campaign named REset Expectations, the company is promising new service standards, some of it executed in new planes.

On January 14, the company made its maiden flight with a new Boeing 737 Max 8. The company said there are four more awaiting entry into service, and one on order. The airline had announced the Max order several years back, intending to replace the older 737-800 models.

CEO Garvin Medera said in a company release that “REset Expectations is the overarching theme that will underpin everything that is done at Caribbean Airlines.” It is boasting a new “signature service”, reinforcing the authenticity of the Caribbean brand, the release from the airline said.

CEO Medera commented: “Surviving the past two years was testimony of our resilience and we are now re-energised. The REset Expectations campaign is the result of feedback from our customers and employees, and validated by sound data. We've listened closely to the sentiments, which enabled us to refocus on enhancing the customer experience.

The airline, headquartered in Port-of-Spain in Trinidad & Tobago, on 14 January flew passengers from the city's Piarco International airport to Kingston, Jamaica, in its new style craft.

The new aircraft has lower fuel and maintenance costs. The 737-8 is described as quieter, more sustainable and integral to the airline's long-term competitiveness.

Medera commented, “The 737-8 is the most technologically advanced aircraft in the world and it brings a range of benefits for Caribbean Airlines, our customers, and the environment.”

The new aircraft has 160 seats in a two-class configuration. The airline currently has seven ATR 72-600 turboprops in operation, and seven earlier-generation Boeing 737-800 aircraft.

CAL ordered 12 MAXes in 2018 to replace its Boeing 737-800 fleet, some past the 20-year mark. Its current MAX fleet is on lease from Air Lease Corporation (ALC). The aim, it was said, is to transition the entire jet fleet to the Boeing 737-8 by July 2022, phasing all its Boeing 737-800s out in the process.

In June 2021, Caribbean Airlines cut 25 per cent of 450 employees and stored many of its aircraft in a restructuring programme. But, after Trinidad & Tobago's borders reopened in July, the airline renewed service to destinations across the region.

The CEO said in his company release, “In the coming months our customers can look forward to new products and services, all crafted with their needs in mind. We're really excited about the planned improvements, and everyone can stay informed via our social media channels and follow us on #RE-calibrate as we reset expectations in 2022.”

According to the company release, one of the most anticipated features of the new campaign is the renewal of the airline's jet fleet; and the entry into service of the Boeing 737-8 – the most technologically advanced aircraft in the world.

In celebration of its 15th anniversary, Caribbean Airlines is also offering to reward customers with additional air miles, chances to win free travel and a 15 per cent, and a 24-hour sale on all destinations which was carded for January 15.

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