Natty Sean, Sizzla break the chains
Sizzla (left) and Natty Sean

Canada-based reggae artiste Natty Sean is pleased with his latest song, Break These Chains, which features Sizzla.

He is hoping the single will firmly place him on the musical map.

“It has been an arduous journey for me to get to this point in my music career. But with great determination and perseverance, I have achieved a lot so far!” said Natty Sean, whose given name is Sean Ambrose.

Break These Chains was released on October 29 and released on all digital platforms, including Spotify and Amazon.

“Social media has influenced my musical career as people use it as a major form of entertainment! And also it's been a great platform for me to showcase my music to a wider audience around the world, “ he said.

Natty Sean was born in St Vincent and the Grenadines and raised in Trinidad and Tobago. He has lived in Canada for the past 19 years, making a name in that country's reggae scene.

“My musical career started in 2009. But I was always creating and singing songs long before that. No one discovered my musical talent! I just have a love and passion for music, and have been pursuing my musical career since then,” he said.

“By the loving grace and mercy of the Almighty granting me life and excellent health and strength. In the next two years, I see myself being more knowledgeable and experienced in the music industry. And also being able to bring forth great music of substance to the people of the wider world,” he continued.

The current novel coroanvirus pandemic has slowed down the global entertainment sector but he anticipates a speedy reopening.

“Due to the current situation that is taking place now, with the COVID-19 pandemic, I don't have any overseas appointments for the rest of the year. That's why I'm here in Jamaica promoting my new song Break These Chains featuring Sizzla, which includes the shooting of a music video for the song. Also I will be recording some new songs for my upcoming debut album which will be scheduled to be released in 2022, “ he added.

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