Prestige keeps faith
Prestige

Reggae artiste Prestige is concerned about a new level of savagery that seems to be creeping into society as well as the rising cost of living. To this end, he has penned Struggle is On, to be released July 18 on the Haad Rokk Muzik label with the hope to inspire.

"The struggle is on. Jamaica was hard before, but it has gone to a new level of depravity and desperation," Prestige said. "The youths have no love for each other, no compassion, not even for the baby on breast, look what happened to the mother and her four kids. The struggle is real, that massacre shows a new level of depravity, our problems are deeper than just poverty," Prestige added.

Prestige was referring to Kemisha Wright and her four children: 15-year-old Kimana Smith, 10-year-old Shemari Smith, five-year-old Kafana Smith, all girls, and 23-month-old son Kishaun Henry who were murdered at their house in Cocoa Piece in Clarendon.

The woman's cousin, Rushane Barnett, has been charged in connection with the killings, which have triggered outrage across the country and reignited the debate on capital punishment.

Prestige, however, doesn't believe capital punishment is the solution.

"More savagery cannot be the answer, more bloodshed cannot be the solution. We have to find a way to heal the nation and stop the bloodshed. We have to show the youths dem a better way. We cannot give up; hold the faith and live on," Prestige said.

Prestige, whose given name is Lauriston Bruce, began his career in his home town of Clark's Town, Trelawny. His career took shape in 1994 under the name Presley when he recorded his debut track Big Time Murderer.

After a name change, he recorded Rise Up and Time is Now.

Prestige

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