Ready to fly
Sharon Marley drops single; album in the works
Sharon Marley

SHARON Marley drops her second single in the past year with today’s release of Butterflies in the Sky.

The daughter of Bob and Rita Marley, who was also part of the multi-Grammy-winning sibling aggregation The Melody Makers with brothers Ziggy and Stephen and sister Cedella, told the Jamaica Observer that she has never stopped singing but was reintroduced to the joys of the craft after recording One More Morning for a tribute album to commemorate her mother’s 75th birthday last year.

“The truth is, I sing everyday; it is a divine energy and gift. But redoing mom’s song One More Morning reintroduced me to using my voice in this way again. Since I have stopped performing on stage I have been using my voice in different ways... to advocate for for women and children.”

“Last year my sister said ‘We are doing an album for Mommy’s birthday, which song do you want?’ And I just chose One More Morning — which is the hardest of Mommy’s songs to sing. The entire song is done in her falsetto, which is keys above my normal range. It was challenging but I enjoyed it. After the first take and I heard ‘Perfect!’ I thought to myself ‘This is easier than I thought. I should do this more often,’ “ she shared.

Singing on her own was never Marley’s intention, however she is so pleased with the experience that she is working on doing more recordings.

“The intention is to do a body of music, for Sharon and people in my age group who just wish to sit, chill and enjoy some music. So, I was was looking at an EP but now its more leaning to an album with about 12 songs.”

Butterflies in the Sky will be one of those tracks. It was written by her son Ingemar Prendergast about two years ago but with no plans at the time, the lyrics were put in the Marley vault until recently when Marley received some rhythms from Polish music producer K-Jah and decided to draw on the lyrics of her son.

“I listened to the rhythms and just chose the one I was feeling and the one [through which] I feel I could present my best self, and decided on the Asteroid rhythm. We then pulled the lyrics from the vault, added a few of my own experiences and inspirations, and this is what we have,” she said.

“I see myself as a butterfly; I am finally coming out of my own cocoon. I have learned from my challenges, overcome issues, and at this time something is pushing me out so I can soar — and I am enjoying it. I am ready to use my beauty and grace, just like the butterfly, to bring goodness to others. I just hope people will be patient and allow me to emerge fully before they knock me down as they like to do with a butterfly,” Marley said.

Set on a solid reggae foundation with jazzy overtones, Marley said Butterflies in the Sky has already been receiving positive feedback from those who have heard it, with persons commenting on how similar she sounds to her mother. The comparison is something Marley said she’s finally getting used to.

“For a long time I didn’t hear it but then my brothers and sisters would say how much I sound like her. Then, I finally started hearing it. I was talking to Grubb Cooper, who has worked extensively with my mother, and when he said how much I sounded like her on this track I guess I just have to accept it... it is what it is. I guess it is my heritage and in my genes. It is not something I have done mechanically or otherwise; it’s my genes and I can’t run away from it. The good thing is that now that I know it, I can embrace it and build on it for the future. It is a continuation of the legacy.”

Sharon Marley’s Butterflies in the Sky is being distributed by ZoJak World Wide.

Richard Johnson

Now you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at https://bit.ly/epaper-login

HOUSE RULES

  1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper; email addresses will not be published.
  2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.
  3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.
  4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.
  5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.
  6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.
  7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy