England lifts Omicron restrictions
UK Health Secretary Sajid Javid

LONDON, United Kingdom (AFP)— England on Thursday lifted coronavirus restrictions imposed to tackle the Omicron variant, with masks no longer required in enclosed places and vaccine passports shelved.

The number of positive COVID-19 cases has fallen sharply over the past two weeks, and although still at high levels, have plateaued in recent days.

The UK government introduced the so-called "Plan B" restrictions on December 8, after Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned of a looming "tidal wave" of Omicron.

Face masks were required in all enclosed spaces and, controversially, vaccine documentation also was to enter places such as nightclubs, football grounds and large-scale events.

On the streets of London around St Paul's Cathedral, there was general support for the lifting of restrictions, which comes after more than 37 million people had booster jabs.

- 'Traumatic' -

England previously lifted restrictions on July 19, so-called "Freedom Day", but then introduced new rules as the Omicron wave arrived.

Health minister Sajid Javid credited the country's booster programme for allowing restrictions to be lifted.

"Our vaccines, testing and antivirals ensure we have some of the strongest defences in Europe and are allowing us to cautiously return to Plan A, restoring more freedoms to this country," he said.

From Thursday, passengers on London's transport network will still be required to wear face masks but they will no longer be mandatory in secondary school classrooms.

"It was traumatic for them, they couldn't hear the teachers, the teachers couldn't hear them," Hynes said of the mask rules in school.

US holidaymaker Ethan Letson, 24, agreed with London Mayor Sadiq Khan's decision to mandate face coverings on the capital's trains and buses.

"I still wear the mask on public transport, I will wear it in very crowded areas like the Underground. It's so tight down there, you could get sick at any time," he said.

Unlike Scotland and Wales, which set their own health policy, England kept nightclubs and bars open over the festive period.

But businesses still took a heavy hit as punters stayed at home.

Hospitality workers in the business district around St Paul's said things had only just started to improve.

"The last week, business has started to pick up again. Around Christmas it was dead," said bartender Lewis Colby, 39.

"People aren't so scared anymore, trains are busier coming into work, people are starting to drink more."

Despite the lifting of restrictions, those who test positive for coronavirus must still self-isolate for a minimum of five days.

Johnson said he also hopes to scrap those rules when they expire on March 24.

HOUSE RULES

  1. We welcome reader comments on the top stories of the day. Some comments may be republished on the website or in the newspaper; email addresses will not be published.
  2. Please understand that comments are moderated and it is not always possible to publish all that have been submitted. We will, however, try to publish comments that are representative of all received.
  3. We ask that comments are civil and free of libellous or hateful material. Also please stick to the topic under discussion.
  4. Please do not write in block capitals since this makes your comment hard to read.
  5. Please don't use the comments to advertise. However, our advertising department can be more than accommodating if emailed: advertising@jamaicaobserver.com.
  6. If readers wish to report offensive comments, suggest a correction or share a story then please email: community@jamaicaobserver.com.
  7. Lastly, read our Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy