WATCH: Go Wild Ja — The Dromedary Camel

KINGSTON, Jamaica — It’s a little late for hump day but we’re still showing appreciation for humps with this week’s Go Wild episode which features the Dromedary Camel.

One of three surviving camel species in the world, the Dromedary Camel has been domesticated for about 4,000 years and in some cultures is a representation of wealth.

The Dromedary Camel is also known as the Arabian camel or the one-humped camel.

Hope Zoo Curator Joey Brown says one of the biggest misconceptions when it comes to camels is that they store water in their humps.

According to Brown, their hump actually stores up to 80 pounds of fat which can be broken down into water and energy when enduring harsh conditions such as those experienced during a drought or in a desert.

This means that after going long periods without water and food, their humps will shrink.

OBSERVER ONLINE reporter Kelsey Thomas stopped by the camels’ quarters this week and met Moses and his four female counterparts.

Watch the video to learn more about this animal.

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