Kashief puts new life into classic
Kashief Lindo

RELEASED in 1972, The Coldest Days of my Life hears The Chi-Lites at their harmonious best. Kashief Lindo, a big fan of soul music from that era, puts a reggae spin on a classic song produced by his father Willie Lindo.

The lovers' rock ballad is scheduled for release on November 25 by Heavy Beat Records, the Florida-based company owned by the Lindos.

"What I love about music from the 70s are the melodies and harmonies of groups like The Chi-Lites and The Stylistics. I grew up hearing those songs through my parents," revealed Kashief during an interview with the Jamaica Observer in October 2021.

Willie Lindo, a leading session musician with Federal Records in Kingston during the 1970s, played guitar on The Coldest Days of my Life. He is accompanied on drums by veteran Paul Douglas, with Kashief playing the other instruments.

The Coldest Days of my Life is the follow-up to See You in Your Arms Tonight, a song from Kashief's album which was released by Heavy Beat Records last year. That label is currently on a roll, having scored a recent number one in South Florida with singer Ambelique's Ain't no Love in The Heart of the City.

Heavy Beat Records has produced Kashief Lindo's best known songs such as No Can Do and What Kind of World. The label also produced Boris Gardiner's monster hit, I Wanna Wake up With You, and Tempted to Touch by Beres Hammond.

— Howard Campbell

Howard Campbell

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