Designer Armani and guests flee wildfire on Sicilian island
Designer Giorgio Armani accepts applause at the end of the Armani Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2018/2019 fashion collection presented Tuesday, July 3, 2018 in Paris. Firefighters are putting out the remnants of two wildfires on a Sicilian island that forced fashion designer Giorgio Armani and dozens more to flee vacation villas overnight. The head of the region’s civil protection agency said Thursday, August 18, 2022 that arson is suspected in two wildfires that forced some 30 people to seek refuge in boats or on safer parts of the island. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)

MILAN (AP) — Firefighters worked Thursday to put out the remnants of two wildfires on a Sicilian island that forced fashion designer Giorgio Armani and dozens of others to flee their vacation villas overnight.

A photo from the island of Pantelleria showed flames appearing to encroach on Armani’s villa, but the Italian designer’s press office said they stopped short of the property. Armani and guests evacuated to a boat in the harbour.

The head of the region’s civil protection agency, Salvatore Cocina, said arson was suspected in two wildfires that forced around 30 people to seek refuge in boats or on safer parts of the island. Firefighters used Canadair planes to douse the flames, along with ground teams to protect homes. Authorities said no structures appeared to have been lost.

The island’s mayor, Vincenzo Campo, told Italian news agency ANSA that two planes were working on putting out the last flames on difficult terrain and that the wind had dropped off.

“After the great fear of last evening and the night spent at work, Pantelleria is returning to normal,” Campo said. “It seems the worst is over.”

Local officials appealed for any information that would help identify the cause of the blaze, which started in two places 400 meters (a quarter-mile) apart.

Pantelleria, located between Sicily and Tunisia, is a popular beach and trekking destination that includes ancient archaeological sites and natural geographic formations.

Scientists say global warming will continue to make weather more extreme and wildfires more frequent and destructive. Much of western Europe saw little rain this summer, and drought conditions coupled with hot weather have fueled destructive forest fires.

So far this summer, wildfires in Spain have blackened more than 700,000 hectares, the largest area since the European Union started collecting satellite data in 2006.

The EU’s Earth Observation Program said more torrid weather was forecast for Spain as two “disastrous” wildfires burned in the eastern part of the country. The fires in the Mediterranean provinces of Alicante and Castellón have each charred more than 13,000 hectares, the EU agency said.

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