Canada struggles to restore power after Fiona
NOVA SCOTIA, Canada — Workers assess downed power poles caused by post- Tropical Storm Fiona in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, on Sunday, September25, 2022. Hundreds of thousands of people in Canada remain without power and officials are trying to assess the scope of devastation from former Hurricane Fiona. (Photos: AP)

TORONTO, Canada (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of people in Canada remained without power Sunday and officials said they found the body of a woman swept into the sea after former Hurricane Fiona washed away houses, stripped off roofs, and blocked roads across the country's Atlantic provinces.

After surging north from the Caribbean, Fiona came ashore before dawn Saturday as a post-tropical cyclone, battering Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Quebec with hurricane-strength winds, rains and waves.

Defence Minister Anita Anand said troops would help remove fallen trees, restore transportation links and do whatever else is required for as long as it takes.

Fiona was blamed for at least five deaths in the Caribbean, and one death in Canada. Authorities found the body of a 73-year-old woman in the water who was missing in Channel-Port Aux Basques, a town on the southern coast of Newfoundland.

NOVA SCOTIA, Canada — Downed power poles and trees are seen near homes in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, on Sunday, September 25, 2022. A day after post-Tropical Storm Fiona left a trail of destruction through Canada and eastern Quebec, residents of a coastal town in western Newfoundland continued to pick through wreckage strewn across their community, easily the most damaged area in the region.

Police said the woman was inside her residence moments before a wave struck the home Saturday morning, tearing away a portion of the basement. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said in a release on social media that with assistance from the Canadian Coast Guard and other rescue teams her body was recovered late Sunday afternoon.

"Living in coastal communities we know what can happen and tragically the sea has taken another from us," said Gudie Hutchings, the Member of Parliament from Newfoundland.

As of Sunday evening, more than 211,000 Nova Scotia Power customers and over 81,000 Maritime Electric customers in the province of Prince Edward Island — about 95 per cent of the total — remained in the dark. So were more than 20,600 homes and businesses in New Brunswick.

More than 415,000 Nova Scotia Power customers — about 80 per cent in the province of almost one million people — had been affected by outages Saturday.

Utility companies say it could be days before the lights are back on for everyone.

Cape Breton Regional Municipality Mayor Amanda McDougall said Sunday that more than 200 people were in temporary shelters. More than 70 roads were completely inaccessible in her region. She said she couldn't count the number of homes damaged in her own neighbourhood.

The mayor said it was critical for the military to arrive and help clear debris, noting that the road to the airport is inaccessible and the tower has significant damage.

McDougall said it is amazing there are no injuries in her community.

"People listened to the warnings and did what they were supposed to do and this was the result," she said

Prince Edward Island Premier Dennis King said that more than 100 military personnel would arrive Sunday to assist in recovery efforts. Schools will be closed Monday and Tuesday. He said many bridges are destroyed.

"The magnitude and severity of the damage is beyond anything that we've seen in our province's history," King said, adding that it would take a "herculean effort by thousands of people" to recover over the coming days and weeks.

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