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Grace Jones
Grace Jones back on Billboard Hot 100 chart

In August iconic Jamaican singer, model, and actress Grace Jones scored her first entry on the Billboard Hot 100 in 35 years when she collaborated with Beyoncé and Nigerian singer Tems on the single Move.

Move entered and peaked at number 55 on the Hot 100 chart. It also ranked on several Billboard charts, including the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart (number 22); 179 on Billboard's Global Excluding US chart; 53 on Global 200; 15 on Hot R&B Songs; 36 on Streaming Songs; 19 on R&B/Hip-Hop Streaming Songs; 18 on R&B/Hip-Hop Digital Song Sales; 15 on R&B Streaming Songs; and 15 on R&B Digital Song Sales.

On Billboard's Canadian Hot 100, Move rose to number 72. The song is featured on Beyoncé's chart-topping eighth studio album Renaissance.

Jones, who has in recent years collaborated with the likes of Gorillaz (their collaboration Charger peaked at number 28 on Billboard's Hot Rock Songs) and hip hop acts Lil Kim and Diddy, says she isn't surprised that she's still able to connect with a new generation of music lovers.

"It doesn't surprise me at all. I try to work with the essentials and essentials never ages," the Spanish Town-born Jones disclosed in an interview with the Jamaica Observer.

Jones said she was surprised when she was contacted to be a part of a collaboration with Beyoncé.

"I was surprised because we don't make the same kind of music, but when she told me the theme of her album I understood why. I listen to mainly Jamaican music; I don't really listen to her music. But I respect what she does, that's why I accepted," Jones shared.

Jones has had an enduring career in music, fashion, and film. With 10 studio albums released, to date, she has made Hollywood stand up and pay attention whenever she graces the big screen.

Among her film credits include Boomerang, A View to a Kill, Straight to Hell, Conan the Destroyer, and the made-for-television film Wolf Girl.

Jones received a Grammy nomination in 1984 in the category Best Video Album for A One Woman Show.

Asked if it has been easy or difficult for her to juggle the arts, Jones said: "They are all in the arts, and I see arts in everything."

Jones' hit songs include My Jamaican Guy, Pull Up to the Bumper, Slave to the Rhythm, I Need a Man, Nipple to the Bottle, Love is the Drug, and Sex Drive (her last number one on the Billboard Dance Club Songs chart in 1993).

She has scored nine albums on the Billboard 200 albums chart with 1981's Nightclubbing charting the highest at 32.

On the Billboard Hot 100, she has, to date, registered eight entries, with Move being her highest peak, while on the UK official charts Jones has 13 entries with Slave to the Rhythm, and Pull Up to the Bumper both peaking at 12.

Asked how important it has been for her to maintain her Jamaican culture in her work through the years, Jones said: "You don't think that way. It's life inevitable that Jamaican culture comes through in everything I do."

Jones, whose last full-length studio release was 2008's Hurricane, is working on new music.

"I'm finishing up the new album with Ivor Guest (British record producer and Emmy-nominated composer), which will be out next year and, of course, the rhythm of Africa will always be present," she disclosed.

In 2018 Jones received the Order of Jamaica.

Footnote: The interview with Grace Jones was facilitated by Grammy-nominated artists and repertoire (A&R) representataive and producer Rodney Hill.

Grace Jones
Kevin Jackson

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