Mortimer McPherson Unveils 'Full Moon'
"In my life, art has often been a way to see the world from a new perspective, a version of climbing inside someone else's skin," said artist and educator Mortimer McPherson, in welcoming guests to his first solo exhibition in five years. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)

Esteemed art educator and fine artist Mortimer McPherson unveiled his first solo exhibition in five years, Full Moon, from his Havendale, St Andrew, studio last Sunday.

The artist, who has established himself as one of Jamaica's finest, delivered a wholesome show with the exhibition. The gallery opening featured 32 pieces with the techniques of graphite on paper, and oil on canvas. With his mother, Edith McPherson, as his primary muse, the art enthusiast executed a stellar showing that left patrons awed.

In his welcome speech, he shared, "The full moon reflects completion, maturity and pregnancy. Ultimately, the moon represents the power of rebirth as it constantly shifts and changes. At the intersection of art and astronomy, and in this title, is a metaphor at work. The moon reflecting sunlight to illuminate the night seemed like an apt symbol of art reflecting the light of science to enlighten the dark corners of the human experience.

In my life, art has often been a way to see the world from a new perspective, a version of climbing inside someone else's skin. It can teach, heal, and inspire, likewise, it can also shock, push, and transform our thinking. Some artists teach us about experiences that we can't possibly have on our own. All the beautiful paintings such as The Mona Lisa, The Last Supper, Starry Night, The Creation of Adam, Sleeping Beauty, etc would not come out of nothingness if the artists such as Leonardo Da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, etc would not have dared to colour them out of the vibrant colours of their imagination through perseverance and dedication. Arts and aesthetics are the spice of life; they are the fragrance of existence."

Saturday Social takes you around the gallery.

Lorraine Thompson-Stewart, senior education officer for visual arts in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information, was the evening's guest speaker. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Artist and educator Mortimer McPherson shared the frame with his wife Denise McPherson (left), daughter Myiesha McPherson (right), and Lorraine Thompson-Stewart, senior education officer for visual arts in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Art educator Mortimer McPherson (left) and his brother Ray Howell, retired principal at Edith Dalton James, shared a moment beside McPherson's painting of their mom, dubbed A Tranquil Gaze. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Artist Mortimer McPherson explained the details of Oh for a Brighter Day to Sandals Foundation Operations Director Karen Zacca. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Mortimer McPherson (right) and his students faced the Saturday Social lens alongside the painting Lovely Relationship. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Dr Desiree Tulloch-Reid admired the artwork Our Times. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Art student Kyle Chong explained Portland Seascape to his financial advisor mother Anita Chong. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)
Attorneys Petra-Lee Davis (left) and Racquel Kerr copped a photo alongside McPherson's In Consideration of Envy. (Photo: Naphtali Junior)

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